Posts tagged ‘resilience’

November 5, 2013

How Parents Can Help Kids Build Their Intelligence

How Parents Can Help Their Kids Build Their IntelligenceChildren don’t start off smart. They become that way over time, with the right kinds of supports and learning opportunities at the right times in their lives. Here are four ways parents can actively participate in their child building a foundation for his or her intelligence:

  1. 1.      Appreciate your child’s unique profile of abilities:
  • Recognize that children’s abilities vary by domain—math, music, language, social, etc.—and that each child has a unique profile of intelligences. A child who’s highly capable in one area may have learning challenges in another area.
  • Pay attention to your child’s changing abilities, goals, attitudes, and interests.
  • Use different kinds of information sources, including school grades, and your own and others’ observations of your child’s interests, concerns, persistence, and motivation.
  • By appreciating individual developmental differences, you increase your child’s engagement in learning and intrinsic motivation, which leads to better learning outcomes, greater self-efficacy, and stronger likelihood of happy productivity across her life span.
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September 1, 2013

How Comforting Kids When They Fail Can Rob Them of Motivation to Learn, by Luc Kumps

thinkingTeachers’ attitudes can have a powerful effect on kids’ motivation. Comforting students when they don’t do well can rob them of their motivation to learn, reduce their likelihood of taking on challenging courses, and lock them into low achievement.

If you believe talent is something a person is born with, or not, you’re more likely than others to give up when faced with difficulties. You’ll think that setbacks indicate the limits of your ability. People who think this way—sometimes called having a ‘fixed mindset’– avoid investing a lot of effort in a task, since effort exposes their lack of natural ability.

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August 29, 2013

From Peril to Promise: 10 Ways to Help Vulnerable Kids Become Resilient

  worriedChildren worry. And some worry more than others. Worrying isn’t necessarily a bad thing, and in fact recent research shows that the most susceptible and vulnerable babies—when they have nurturing parents and safe, dependable early environments—can become the most successful people of all.* What can parents do to help their kids thrive? In this blog, we review our top 10 suggestions for parents who want to translate their children’s worries into lifelong resilience.

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August 29, 2013

Intelligence and Bullying

rsz_boy_with_arms_crossedAnyone who’s different than others is more likely than other kids to feel isolated. This is especially true in the early adolescent years of 11 to 14, when fitting in is more important than at any other time in a person’s life.

Being smart is enough to trigger rejection, envy, or aggression by classmates, although it doesn’t always bring the knowledge or wisdom to deal well with social problems like these. Rejection can take the form of bullying, whether with gestures, words (Nerd! Brainiac! Geek!), physical violence, or cyber-attacks, all of which can be hurtful or even traumatic.

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August 29, 2013

Beyond Intelligence

hands joining in the centreIntelligence matters. At the same time, however, achievement, success, happiness, and fulfillment in life are built on a lot of different factors that go beyond intelligence, at least as intelligence is conventionally defined. Some children are academically advanced, and others make friends easily. Some kids are inclined to athletics, and some excel at music. Some are great at mathematical analysis, and others have well-developed ‘street smarts.’

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