Posts tagged ‘coping skills’

September 1, 2013

How Comforting Kids When They Fail Can Rob Them of Motivation to Learn, by Luc Kumps

thinkingTeachers’ attitudes can have a powerful effect on kids’ motivation. Comforting students when they don’t do well can rob them of their motivation to learn, reduce their likelihood of taking on challenging courses, and lock them into low achievement.

If you believe talent is something a person is born with, or not, you’re more likely than others to give up when faced with difficulties. You’ll think that setbacks indicate the limits of your ability. People who think this way—sometimes called having a ‘fixed mindset’– avoid investing a lot of effort in a task, since effort exposes their lack of natural ability.

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September 1, 2013

Are Some Kids Born Smart? Or Do They Become Smart?

???????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????Are some kids born smart? Or do they become smart? Is there anything parents and teachers can do to help kids become more intelligent or use their intelligence more productively?

Carol Dweck’s work on mindsets is part of a transformation in progress concerning how people understand giftedness, and how gifted education is delivered. In this article published in the Growth Mindset Blog, we think about some of the myths that are being challenged by recent findings on mindsets and intelligence:

http://community.mindsetworks.com/blog-page/home-blogs/entry/mindsets-and-gifted-education-transformation-in-progress#.UL_PV4ExB5s.facebook

September 1, 2013

Reassurance, Coping Skills, Action, and Resilience: How to Handle Tragedy with Kids

mother comforting sonAll children have worries. But worries can intensify when they hear alarming radio and television broadcasts, and adults talking or—worse—whispering about random shootings, floods, evacuations, and other frightening events. Children can find it difficult to put their own apprehension into words, get past a sense of isolation, or calm the feeling that the world is out of control—especially if adults exclude them from conversations about what matters.

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August 29, 2013

From Peril to Promise: 10 Ways to Help Vulnerable Kids Become Resilient

  worriedChildren worry. And some worry more than others. Worrying isn’t necessarily a bad thing, and in fact recent research shows that the most susceptible and vulnerable babies—when they have nurturing parents and safe, dependable early environments—can become the most successful people of all.* What can parents do to help their kids thrive? In this blog, we review our top 10 suggestions for parents who want to translate their children’s worries into lifelong resilience.

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August 29, 2013

Intelligence and Bullying

rsz_boy_with_arms_crossedAnyone who’s different than others is more likely than other kids to feel isolated. This is especially true in the early adolescent years of 11 to 14, when fitting in is more important than at any other time in a person’s life.

Being smart is enough to trigger rejection, envy, or aggression by classmates, although it doesn’t always bring the knowledge or wisdom to deal well with social problems like these. Rejection can take the form of bullying, whether with gestures, words (Nerd! Brainiac! Geek!), physical violence, or cyber-attacks, all of which can be hurtful or even traumatic.

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