Archive for ‘gifted education’

September 1, 2013

How Comforting Kids When They Fail Can Rob Them of Motivation to Learn, by Luc Kumps

thinkingTeachers’ attitudes can have a powerful effect on kids’ motivation. Comforting students when they don’t do well can rob them of their motivation to learn, reduce their likelihood of taking on challenging courses, and lock them into low achievement.

If you believe talent is something a person is born with, or not, you’re more likely than others to give up when faced with difficulties. You’ll think that setbacks indicate the limits of your ability. People who think this way—sometimes called having a ‘fixed mindset’– avoid investing a lot of effort in a task, since effort exposes their lack of natural ability.

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September 1, 2013

Are Some Kids Born Smart? Or Do They Become Smart?

???????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????Are some kids born smart? Or do they become smart? Is there anything parents and teachers can do to help kids become more intelligent or use their intelligence more productively?

Carol Dweck’s work on mindsets is part of a transformation in progress concerning how people understand giftedness, and how gifted education is delivered. In this article published in the Growth Mindset Blog, we think about some of the myths that are being challenged by recent findings on mindsets and intelligence:

http://community.mindsetworks.com/blog-page/home-blogs/entry/mindsets-and-gifted-education-transformation-in-progress#.UL_PV4ExB5s.facebook

August 29, 2013

Group-Administered Intelligence Tests and Gifted Identification

rsz hand mathMany school districts are using group IQ tests (aka, intelligence tests, or tests of cognitive ability) to identify children’s need for gifted education. These tests have some advantages, and also some inherent problems.

Individually-administered IQ tests—tests where a psychologist sits with one child for 90 minutes to 2 hours, and asks a series of standardized questions that vary depending on the child’s responses—are by far the most reliable indicators of kids’ learning needs. They have many flaws (which we discuss elsewhere—see links below) but they provide the most useful and targeted information about a child’s learning strengths and weaknesses.

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